The Internet's Best Practices for Ministry

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Welcoming Guests and First Impressions

The sermon starts in the parking lot, and the impression you make for your guests on Sunday morning during the first 10 minutes will be indelible.

Technology and The Church

Leveraging technology for ministry can be an incredible blessing. But it can also be fraught with problems and pitfalls. Learn how to use technology well.

Vision and Leadership

Our God longs for leaders to request of Him to do that which they cannot. Faith filled vision, leadership and risk are key ingredients for ministry.

Preaching and Communication

You know and understand how challenging it is to communicate. It is hard to get and capture people's attention. Learn how to communicate effectively.

Creativity and Innovation

Being creative means asking the right questions and making new associations. Discover new and creative ideas for your ministry.

12 Unfortunate Reasons Why Churches Neglect Church Discipline

excerpted from Chuck Lawless at Thom Rainer's blog

Here are the twelve (8 posted here) unfortunate, yet true, reasons why churches neglect church discipline.

  1. They don’t know the Bible’s teaching on discipline. I can only guess what percentage of regular attenders in evangelical churches even know that the Bible teaches the necessity of church discipline. This topic is one that some pastors choose to avoid.
  2. They have never seen it done before. Some of the reticence to do church discipline is the result of ignorance. Frankly, I admit my own ignorance when I began serving as a pastor 30+ years ago. If you’ve never been part of a church that carried out discipline, it’s easy to let any of these following reasons halt the process.
  3. They don’t want to appear judgmental. “Judge not, lest you be judged” takes precedence over any scripture that calls for discipline, especially in a culture where political correctness rules the day. Judging, it seems, is deemed an unchristian act.
  4. The church has a wide-open front door. Church discipline is challenging to do if membership expectations are few; that is, it’s difficult to hold someone accountable to standards never stated in the first place. The easier it is to join the church, the harder it is to discipline people when necessary.
  5. They have had a bad experience with discipline in the past. For those churches that have done discipline, the memories of poorly done discipline seem to last long. They remember confrontation, judgment, heartache, and division – with apparently no attempt to produce repentance and reconciliation.
  6. The church is afraid to open “Pandora’s box.” If they discipline one church member, they fear establishing a pattern that can’t be halted as long as human beings comprise their congregation. To put it another way, they wonder how many members will remain if they discipline every member with unrepentant sin.
  7. They have no guidelines for discipline. For what sins is discipline necessary? At what point does church leadership choose to make public a private sin? Rather than wrestle with tough questions, many churches just ignore the topic.
  8. They fear losing members (or dollars). We hope no congregation makes decisions based solely on attendance and income, but we know otherwise. Sometimes churches tolerate sin rather than risk decline.
Read the last 4 at the original post

3 Keys To Raising Support Before Groups


excerpted from SRS blog

Here are three keys to help direct you as you engage with groups during your support-raising journey. But, understand you will not have near as much time making a presentation to a church or group as you would in a one-on-one appointment. The average amount of time afforded missionary presentations at churches is a whopping 7.5 minutes! Here are the keys:

1. Maximize what does work well with groups:
  • Cast vision for your ministry – This is your primary task throughout your support raising, whether with groups or individuals. Though a crowd won’t be able to experience you moving to the edge of your seat and leaning in as you enthusiastically share about your call and vision for this ministry, they can still sense your passion as you describe your ministry and where God is leading you.
  • Inspire with stories – Groups have little tolerance for “information dumping” so don’t spend precious time talking about the detailed strategies or the demographics of your assignment. Focus on people! Tell stories about individual lives that have been touched by you or the organization you’re joining. Leave them thinking about a specific person whose eternal future they have a chance to invest in.
  • Challenge – Make it clear where they fit into the picture you have just painted. No need to appear “needy” or use emotionally manipulative language. Just let them know you are called to a God-sized task and you recognize there is no way you can accomplish it without a solid team of God-called ministry partners standing behind you and holding the ropes.
2. Minimize what does not work well with groups:
  • The ASK – Remember in a group the basic axiom is, “everybody’s business is nobody’s business.” So don’t be surprised or disheartened when you don’t get the same type of response from a group as you do making the ask in face-to-face appointments. In a group or church talk clearly about how you are funded through ministry partners, and that you would like to opportunity to talk to many of them more personally about how they can be a part of that team.
  • Building Relationships – Raising support will always be more about relationships than money, and a group presentation is a great way to spur interest in you and your ministry. Have fun creating a “buzz” about all that God is doing! Leverage their newfound interest into immediate and specific ways they can get involved. Ideally, have sign-up cards that will gather their contact info so you can personally follow up with each one. This fosters the relational connection that is so important to developing lasting ministry partners.
3. “See the trees in the forest!”— recognize the potential a group holds:
  • Connect with and cultivate key leaders – Even though you may have a friend or advocate in a certain church, the pastor is both shepherd and gatekeeper and needs to be respected and included. Additionally, missions committee members (and other influencers who know about your work) are important connections to nurture.
  • Bless them for what they are already doing to support missions. You won’t be the first or only missionary they are associated with, so before you invite them to do even more, start off by thanking them for what they are already doing to advance the Kingdom…even if it doesn’t directly benefit you. Gratitude begets generosity, in your spirit as well as theirs.
  • Identify smaller sub-sets within the group you can also approach. Enlist the help of an “insider” who knows the various affinity group that operate within the larger assembly you are addressing. These may be Sunday School classes, home groups, men’s or women’s bible studies, youth ministries, etc…Whether or not the large group or church chooses to support you, these smaller groups sometimes yield even greater responses. Just remember as you are make your presentations you are always seeking to channel these potential partners into individual appointments.
read the entire post HERE
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